Category: pie (page 1 of 5)

Dutch apple pie: A Thanksgiving tradition

Dutch Apple Pie for Thanksgiving
Dutch apple pie has always been a part of my family Thanksgivings, or at least for as long as I can remember. My mom doesn’t fancy herself a baker, but she would always pick up a Mrs. Smith Dutch apple pie, as well as a spiced pumpkin pie for herself.

Once I got into baking, and trying my hand at pies, I tackled the Dutch Apple. The New Best Recipe, from Cook’s Illustrated, is a fantastic book for baking science and testing techniques, and it’s where I found my first Dutch Apple recipe to work with.

Since then, I’ve adapted the recipe to fit my own needs and tastes, and it’s always a joy to make and bring to my family table.

Dutch Apple Pie

Yields: 1 9-inch pie

  • Pie Crust Ingredients
  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (keep in freezer until ready to use)
  • 3 tbsp plus 1 to 2 tbsp whiskey (or use equal amount of ice water)
  • Apple Filling Ingredients
  • 4 large Granny Smith apples (about 2 lbs)
  • 
3 large Cortland apples (about 1 1/2 lbs)

  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar

  • 1/2 teaspoon Chinese 5 spice

  • 1/4 tsp salt

  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter

  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Streusel Topping Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups flour

  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar

  • 1/4 tsp Chinese 5 spice
  • 1/4 tsp salt

  • 7 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

Begin with the pie dough so it has time to chill. Pulse together flour, sugar and salt in a food processor.

Blend in butter by dropping a cube at a time into the food processer, just until most of mixture resembles coarse meal with some roughly pea-size butter lumps.

Drizzle 3 tbsp whiskey over the mixture and pulse a few times until incorporated.

Squeeze a small handful of dough: If it doesn't hold together, add more whiskey or ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, pulsing until just incorporated, then test again. Do not overwork dough, or pastry will be tough.

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. With heel of your hand, smear the dough once or twice in a forward motion to help distribute fat.

Gather dough together, with a pastry scraper if you have one, and press into a ball.

Form into 1 disk, wrap in plastic wrap and chill until firm, at least 1 hour.

Once the pie dough has chilled, grease a pie plate and roll out the bottom crust. Fit it into the plate, trimming the edge, folding it under, and then pinching it into a fluted design.

Place the bottom crust into the fridge to chill for 40 minutes, or in the freezer for a faster chill of 20 minutes.

For the filling, combine the peeled, cored and sliced apples in a large mixing bowl with the sugar, Chinese 5 Spice and salt. Toss to combine.

Heat the butter in a dutch oven over medium-high heat until the foaming subsides. Add the apple mixture and cook with the lid on for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Remove the lid and cook for an additional 5-10 minutes until the apples have softened.

Place a colander over a large bowl and drain the apples, shaking a bit to get as much juice drained as possible. Set the apples aside.

Return the juices to the dutch oven and add the heavy cream. Heat the mixture over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring.

Continue cooking and stirring the juice/cream mixture until it's thick enough that a wooden spoon leaves a trail in the mixture. This should be about 5 minutes. Once thickened, take off the heat and set aside.

Heat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit and prepare the crust for a blind bake. Line the top of the crust with parchment paper or aluminum foil and fill with either dried beans or pie weights.

Bake for 18-25 minutes until the crust is lightly golden. Cool on a wire rack while you make the streusel.

To make the streusel, combine the flour, sugar, brown sugar, Chinese 5 spice and salt, stirring. Pour the melted butter over the dry ingredients, tossing with a fork until all is evenly moistened. The mixture should form large chunks as well as smaller, pea-sized pieces.

Line a baking pan with parchment paper and turn the streusel out onto, spreading it out. Bake for 10-15 minutes until the streusel is golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly.

To assemble the pie, heat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and prep a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper (this will help catch any drips).

Spoon the apples into the crust, spreading them out evenly, then spoon over the cream mixture. Crumble the streusel over the top and bake for another 10-15 minutes until the filling is bubbling slightly.

Remove from the oven and cool before serving.

20+ tips for creating the perfect Thanksgiving pie crust

Beautiful top crusts for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is next week! Are you ready? Have you made your pie dough, polished your pie plates, and lined your recipes up? Or are you a bit of a hot mess who is this close to throwing in the towel and buying a Mrs. Smith frozen pie?

Well don’t give up yet! Making a pie doesn’t have to be the bane of your existence, and to help you out, I’ve pulled together some of my favorite posts about the formidable pie crust from pie-making masters across the web for a sum total of 20+ tips:

And if you’re looking for some Thanksgiving pie recipe inspirations, check out some of my own!

The pie’s the limit!

Earl Grey Peach Pie with Thyme missing a sliceOn Saturday, Collingswood Farmers Market hosted its annual peach pie baking competition, and this year Ray and I changed it up a bit. We BOTH entered.

Both of our pie ideas were just too good to pass on, so when you have 2 ideas and 2 people, you get 2 pies. Or in this case, a pie and a tart.

Herb and Chevre Peach Tart with Balsamic Crust

Ray’s entry into the peaches-plus category: Herb and Chevre Peach Tart with Balsamic Crust

However, today’s post isn’t going to have my usual pie recipes in it. For that, you’ll have to wait for my article on Table Matters to publish (mean, I know).

Early Gre Peach Pie with Thyme

My entry into the peaches-only category (where peaches are the only fruit to be used): Earl Grey Peach Pie with Thyme

The outcome of the baking contest was that my pie came in 3rd place for presentation, Ray’s tart made it up onto the scoreboard for his category of peaches-plus (I think he was in 4th or 5th place), but my Earl Grey Peach Pie with Thyme did not get any flavor points from the judges in the peaches-only category. Maybe it was too weird, but we really liked it!

Sour cherries, summer baking, and food writing

Table Matters Tarte Diem post

It’s been nearly a month since I last posted … yikes.

Since then, I’ve road-tripped to Asheville with Ray, picked sour cherries, wrote about sour cherries, baked cookies, made caramel corn, and baked a bunch of cupcakes.  All in the heat of Philly’s summer, which let me tell you, is not the most pleasant when your kitchen is tiny and very far away from the AC window unit.

Summer has also drained away some of my baking inspiration, which has been sort of eating away at me. But, my somewhat monthly writing gig for Table Matters has been pretty awesome, and helps me stir up some baking mojo.

Cherry Cheese Pie Recipe for Table Matters

My post about sour cherries was the first that was photographed by their staff photographer, and wow. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen my desserts look this good before!

Rosemary Sour Cherry Galette recipe for Table Matters

And those cookies I mentioned? Well they turned out divine; I think I have a new base I can use for everything from chocolate chip to dried fruit cookies. Look for a post in the next week or so!

And I think once the weather cools off and the busyness of summer calms down, I’ll be back in the kitchen and telling you all about it.

6 pie recipes for Pi Day!

Pie recipes from Cupcake Friday Project

Happy Pi Day! And to celebrate, I have 6 recipes to share with you, as well as a couple books you should pick up if you’re an avid pie baker.

From my personal recipe collection:
Caramel apple pecan praline pie
Cherry cheese pie
Peach praline pie

Pie recipes from Pinterest

Clockwise from the upper left: Apple cider cream pie, apple pie with Biscoff crust, and salted chocolate pecan pie

From my Pinterest board:
Apple cider cream pie
Apple pie with Biscoff crust
Salted chocolate pecan pie

And here are two amazing pie books :

Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book

We own The Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book and it’s stunning. I’ve taken some inspiration for flavors from the book, but should really sit down with it and bake off some of their recipes.

First Prize Pies

I’ve been a fan of Allison Kave ever since I discovered Butter & Scotch, and First Prize Pies is definitely on my Amazon wishlist!

Tiny lemon curd pies

Tiny lemon curd pies
Whenever we have friends over, I always take time to whip up a dessert. For one thing, it’s kind of expected—me being “the baker” and all—and I enjoy coming up with new recipes to try.

Originally I was going to make a lemon meringue pie, but then realized that a finger-food dessert would be better. And thus these tiny lemon curd pies were born … and devoured.

The beauty of this dessert is that if you have some pie dough in the freezer (I did) and lemon curd in the fridge (I didn’t … but I did have lemons, so I was able to whip it up), this dessert comes together very easily, which is key when you’re entertaining.

Tiny lemon curd pies

  • Pie Crust Ingredients
  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (keep in freezer until ready to use)
  • 2 1/2 tbsp, plus 1 to 2 tbsp whiskey (or use equal amount of ice water)
  • Lemon Curd Ingredients
  • Zest of 3 lemons
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 2 eggs
  • 6 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into small cubes

For the pie dough, pulse together flour, sugar and salt in a food processor. Blend in butter by dropping a cube at a time into the food processer, just until most of mixture resembles coarse meal with some roughly pea-size butter lumps.

Drizzle the whiskey over the mixture and pulse a few times until incorporated.

Squeeze a small handful of dough: If it doesn't hold together, add more whiskey 1 tablespoon at a time, pulsing until just incorporated, then test again. Do not overwork dough, or pastry will be tough.

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. With heel of your hand, smear the dough once or twice in a forward motion to help distribute fat.

Gather dough together, with a pastry scraper if you have one, and press into a ball.

Divide in half and form into 1 disks Wrap it in plastic wrap and chill until firm, at least 1 hour.

In the meantime, make the lemon curd.

In a large metal mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, yolks, sugar and zest.

Whisk in the juice.

Place the bowl over a pot of simmering water to make a bain marie and clip a candy thermometer to the side of the bowl.

Stir the curd continually for 12-15 minutes until it reaches roughly 178-180 degrees Fahrenheit on the thermometer.

Take the curd off the heat, and position a fine mesh sieve over a bowl.

Pour the curd through the sieve, using a flexible spatula to press it through, holding back the zest and any cooked egg. Discard.

Add the butter and stir until melted.

Let the curd cool and refrigerate until ready to serve. [Please note: this curd must be refrigerated ... it is not shelf stable].

Heat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and center your oven rack.

When you're ready to bake the tiny crusts, remove the dough from the fridge and divide it into 20-24 portions (mine came out to approximately 1/2 ounce each). Roll into a ball.

Grease a mini-cupcake pan and place each of the dough balls inside. Gently flatten each ball down into the base of the cup, then spread up, shaping the dough to fit each indent.

Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until the edges are golden. The mini pie crusts will puff up a bit, but that's ok.

Remove the pan and place on a cooling rack. While the crust is still hot, us a melon baller, back of a spoon, or another utensil (Not your fingers! It's too hot!) to gently press the crust back down.

Let cool for 15-20 minutes before removing the tiny pie crusts from the pan and placing on your serving dish. Cool fully before adding a tablespoon of lemon curd to each pie crust.

Serve at room temperature and seal up any extras in an airtight container.

Older posts
Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE